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pmacdona
From: pmacd...@sol.UVic.CA (Peter MacDonald)
Subject: SLS: A Free Linux Distribution
Message-ID: <1992Aug12.221330.7373@sol.UVic.CA>
Originator: pmacd...@sol.UVic.CA
Sender: n...@sol.UVic.CA
Nntp-Posting-Host: sol.uvic.ca
Organization: University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C. CANADA
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 92 22:13:30 GMT
Lines: 98

Forgive if this is a repost, Pnews hung on my last send :-)

Linux is already available from a distribution service (commercial
found at the end since none of you will want to use it anyways).
 
What I am looking for is an FTP admin (Jim W. , you listening?)
to allow the upload it (about 17Meg) to your archive.  
Also about a dozen burly (in hacker terms this means
you are more likely to say "the following patch..." than "why don't
you...") volunteers to excercise and criticise it.  Respond via mail
please.
 
This distribution is different primarily because it has an initial
install program which does everything except fdisk and mkfs,
it breaks everything into packages, which can be
stored on DOS floppies, meaning disk images don't have to be posted
(except for the boot and utils disks), and because it has a menu
driven sysadmin program.

Also a primary goal was to try to stem the tide of postings
due to misconfigured systems.
 
Following is the readme file from the distribution.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Here is release .96c of the SoftLanding Linux System (SLS),
which is NOT just an image dump of someones Unix system.
Instead its primary purposes are:

0) provide an initial installation program (for the quesy).
1) utilities compiled to use minimal disk space.
2) provide a reasonably complete/integrated U*ix system.
3) provide a means to install and uninstall packages.
4) permit partial installations for small disk configs.
5) add a menu driven, extensible system administration.
6) take the hassle out of collecting and setting up a system.
7) give non internet users access to Linux (dist service).

In particular, the menu interface allows the users to see
what commands would be executed if an option was selected,
so that Unix newbies who use it, don't have to always stay 
newbies (this was my big complaint about DELL, ISC, etc).
In some ways, however, this release is more a framework than
a finished product in that much more can be added to the menus.
So be forewarned.

This distribution is freely available if you have internet 
access, or an obliging friend with access to it.
The distribution is made up of 15 disks, only the first two of 
which are not DOS formatted floppies. Each disk contains about 
1100K of stuff.  You can, however, get a pretty complete system with 
just disk 1-4, or if you already have linux up, just disks 3 and 4.

There are several reasons for using DOS formatted 
floppies for for distribution:

1) it is easier for first time users to download/bootstrap
2) it is easier to post/view/maintain/change the distribution.
3) users can take just the parts from each disk they want.
4) DOS diskcopy can be used to backup all but disks 1 and 2. 

This is a binary mostly distribution (except for the kernel), and
is broken into 2 parts: base (10 disks) and X (5 disks).
Highlights of the base are:  gcc/g++, emacs, kermit, elm/mail/uucp, 
gdb, sc (spreadsheet), man pages, groff, elvis, zip/zoo/lh and menu.  
Highlights of X are: X, programmers libs, 75 dpi fonts, games (spider,
tetris, xvier, chess, othello, xeyes, etc) and utilities like xmag, 
xmenu, xcolormap, and gwm.

Utilities < 40K are linked -N (in most cases) to eliminate the 
header, so much disk space is saved.  Disk usage is as follows:

Minimal base system:     3 Meg
Full base system:       16 Meg
Full base system + X11: 27 Meg

An auto installation utility is provided which does all the work
after the user does an fdisk and mkfs.  Installation begins with

	doinstall /dev/hd? 

which installs some or all software onto the hard drive, generates a
new boot disk, and then asks the user to reboot to use the hard disk.
This should be more or less fool proof :-).

Other configurations are easily obtainable, by using the sysinstall
utility to install and uninstall selected packages.  

The SLS system is available, primarily for non-netters from:

	Softlanding Software
	910 Lodge Ave. 
	Victoria, B.C., Canada
	V8X-3A8
	(604) 360-0188

for $3.25/disk US ($4.00/disk Canadian) copying charge.
See Softlanding for a gentle touch down from a DOS bailout.

Newsgroups: comp.os.linux
Path: sparky!uunet!destroyer!ubc-cs!news.UVic.CA!sanjuan!pmacdona
From: pmacdona@sanjuan (Peter MacDonald)
Subject: SLS update
Message-ID: <1992Aug20.020635.24477@sol.UVic.CA>
Sender: n...@sol.UVic.CA
Nntp-Posting-Host: sanjuan.uvic.ca
Organization: University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CANADA
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 92 02:06:35 GMT
Lines: 275

A new README, 1.Z and some misc files in 3/ has been uploaded to 
tsx-11.mit.edu.  The new bootimage has an improved install script
which allows for things like installing from the B: drive.  Disk3
now contains a copy of the readme, plus the boot_b.exe and boot_b.doc
files, so that SLS can now be installed from the B: drive, yes, even
the boot.  It also correctly sets the /lib/libm.a libhard.2.2.2 if
you tell it you have a 387.

Following is the readme file.   Hopefully, it answers some of the 
plethora of questions I have been getting, but can not answer
because mail is broken on my workstation.  

FTP site administrators: I guess it is ok to mirror or download
it to your site now.  Good Luck, and hope some find it usefull.

Peter.

-----------------------------------------------------

SLS (Softlanding Linux System) Copywrite 1992, Softlanding Software.

Here is release .96c of the SoftLanding Linux System (SLS),
which is NOT just an image dump of someones Unix system.

This distribution is freely available if you have internet 
access, or an obliging friend with access to it.


PRIMARY PURPOSES:

0) provide an initial installation program (for the queasy).
1) utilities compiled to use minimal disk space.
2) provide a reasonably complete/integrated U*ix system.
3) provide a means to install and uninstall packages.
4) permit partial installations for small disk configs.
5) add a menu driven, extensible system administration.
6) take the hassle out of collecting and setting up a system.
7) give non internet users access to Linux.

In particular, the menu interface allows the users to see what 
commands (using "v") would be executed if an option was selected,
so that Unix newbies who use it, don't have to always stay 
newbies (this was my big complaint about DELL, ISC, etc).
In some ways, however, this release is more a framework than
a finished product in that much more can be added to the menus.
So be forewarned.

There are several reasons for using DOS formatted 
floppies for for distribution:

1) it is easier for first time users to download/bootstrap
2) it is easier to view/maintain/change the distribution.
3) users can take just the parts from each disk they want.
4) DOS diskcopy can be used to backup all but disks 1 and 2. 

In future, when bmap support comes to DOS FS, a look will 
be taken at putting disks 1 and 2 on DOS formatted floppies
as well, so that replication of the system using just DOS
diskcopy is feasable.

DISTRIBUTION CONTENTS:

SLS is a binary mostly distribution (except for the kernel), and
is broken into 2 parts: base (10 disks) and X (5 disks).
Highlights of the base are:  gcc/g++, emacs, kermit, elm/mail/uucp, 
gdb, sc (spreadsheet), man pages, groff, elvis, zip/zoo/lh and menu.  
Highlights of X are: X, programmers libs, 75 dpi fonts, games (spider,
tetris, xvier, chess, othello, xeyes, etc) and utilities like xmag, 
xmenu, xcolormap, and gwm.

Utilities < 40K are linked -N (in most cases) to eliminate the 
header, so much disk space is saved.  Disk usage is as follows:

Minimal base system:     6 Meg
Full base system:       20 Meg
Full base system + X11: 30 Meg

Other combinations are easily obtainable, by using the sysinstall
utility to install and uninstall selected packages.   The next release
will have better documentation, jump tables (hopefully) and a more 
complete and flexible installation utility.

In brief, the disks contain the following:

	disk1: Boot and Ramdisk FS image.
	disk2: Utilities disk.
	disk3: Contains the base system, minus the /usr/bin directory.
	disk4: Contains the base systems /usr/bin/ directory.
	disk5: Contains the kernel source code, and the GNU debugger Gdb.
	disk6: Contains the base systems man pages and uucp (for mail).
	disk7: Contains the gcc compiler and libs.
	disk8: Contains the GNU C++ compiler and grof utils.
	disk9: Contains mail, grof and include files.
	disk10: Contains emacs.
	disk11: Contains the base X-windows system.  You will need at least this
		and X386 from xextr1.1 to run X-windows.
	disk12: Contains the X386 server and some games and things.
	disk13: Contains the programmers libraries etc, for compiling X programs.
	disk14: Contains the 75 Dot/inch fonts for X.
	disk15: Contains gwm (Generic Window Manager) which can emulate Motif and others.

INSTALLATION:

The distribution is made up of 15 disks, only the first two of 
which are not DOS formatted floppies. Each disk contains about 
1100K of stuff.  You can, however, get a pretty complete system with 
just disk 1-4, or if you already have linux up, just disks 3 and 4.
You may want to get just 1-4 first and do a minimal install, just
to get a feel for the system.

First thing, write protect all disks, as the install process doesn't
need to write to any distribution disk.   After that just boot with 
Disk1 in drive A: (or drive B: if using the boot_b method below).  
When prompted, replace with Disk2 (the utilities disk) as requested
by the menu. 

Once the utilities disk is mounted, you will need to use fdisk, and
then mkfs on the selected partition (see the next section).   Once
that is done you can just type:

	doinstall /dev/PART

where PART is the disk partition you created with fdisk, and you 
should be off to the races.  The auto installation utility "doinstall"
does all of the remaining work of installing some or all software onto 
the hard drive, and generating a new boot disk.  It then asks you to 
reboot to start using Linux from the hard disk.  The questions 
"doinstall" asks are pretty straightforward, and should be more or 
less fool resistant :-).


USING FDISK AND MKFS:

Before you can install Linux on your hard drive, you must partition your
drive, and put a file system on it.  Roughly, this entails:

 - Create a Linux/Minix partition with "fdisk" on your hard drive and reboot.
 - Make a file system on the partition with "mkfs".
 - Use "doinstall /dev/PART", where PART is your partition, to start 
   the installation.  For example "doinstall /dev/hda2".

This last step will ask you to put a formatted floppy in the drive
so that BOOT DISK can be prepared for you, so have one ready ahead of time.  
When the installation is complete, and you reboot from this floppy, you 
will be using Linux from your hard drive.

Before you begin, however, you may wish to type "menu" and browse the
Instructions submenu.  But make sure you exit "menu" before you start
the install process.  You can also print files from there using "P",
or you can use "cat README > /dev/lp1" or "cat README > /dev/lp2".

Your first task after the base install is done, should be to make backup
copies of all of your disks  (Look in the "User Commands" menu).
Even before you begin the install, you can use DOS diskcopy to
create backup of disk 3-15, or all but the first two disks.
In fact, you should make sure all disks are write protected first,
before you start the installation.


**************** EXAMPLE PARTITIONING PROCEDURE **************************
/# fdisk
 
Command (m for help): n
Command action
   e   extended
   p   primary partition (1-4)
p
Partition number (1-4): 2
First cylinder (500-977): 500
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (500-977): 977
 
Command (m for help): t
Partition number (1-4): 1
Hex code (type L to list codes): 81
 
Command (m for help): v
Command (m for help): p
 
Disk /dev/hda: 5 heads, 17 sectors, 977 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 85 * 512 bytes
 
   Device Boot  Begin   Start     End  Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda1           1       1     499   20000    4  DOS
/dev/hda2           1       1       7   30000   81  Linux/MINIX

Command (m for help): w
reboot now before doing anything else
/#
...
/# mkfs /dev/hda2 30000
/# doinstall /dev/hda2
**************** END OF EXAMPLE PARTITIONING PROCEDURE *******************

BOOTING FROM DRIVE B:

If your boot drive is a different format than your floppies (ie, one 
is 5 1/4 and the other is 3 1/2), and you have a drive B: then do the 
following, which allows booting from the B: drive:

 1 - Boot up Dos
 2 - Put Disk3 in drive B:
 3 - Put a blank formatted disk in A:
 4 - Type b:\boot_b    #if this fails, read B:boot_b.doc
 5 - Remove Disk3 and put Disk1 in drive B:
 6 - Reboot

DOWNLOADING:

If obtaining via FTP, just use rawwrite.exe to write 1 and 2 to 
floppy.   Rawwrite.exe is available in tsx-11.mit.edu:/pub/linux/INSTALL.
Download all files in each subdir to a DOS (or Linux) formatted disks, 
and  you are ready to go.   The kernel is 96c, slightly modified to 
try all FS types when none is specified on a mount, so install will
work either way.  In future, I will probably eliminate this and just
have the install script try all types.


AVAILABILITY:

The SLS system is also available, primarily for non-netters from:

	Softlanding Software
	910 Lodge Ave. 
	Victoria, B.C., Canada
	V8X-3A8
	(604) 360-0188

for $3.25/disk US ($4.00/disk Canadian) copying charge,
for 5 1/4 format.  Add $1/disk for 3 1/2 format.  Add  GST (7%) 
and PST/SST as applicable, plus $10.00 S&H.  Prices are subject
to change without notice.  Sources are available on a component 
by components, as requested basis, for the same 
distribution fees as above.  There will be NO update disks 
from Softlanding for this version,  but starting, probably, 
with the next version when jump tables and >64 processes is 
available, a 2-3 disk update issue will be looked at.

Notice:  There is no warranty with this product, either expressed
or implied.  Use at your own risk.  Softlanding is not liable or
responsible for damage or loss incurred or resulting from the use
or misuse of this product, and it's responsibility is limited to
providing copies of disks.  Softlanding charges only for the copy 
service, not the content.  The content is made freely distributable
at no charge, subject to the following restrictions.


RESTRICTIONS:

Please read the file COPYING which outlines the GNU copying 
restrictions.  The linux kernel is copywrite Linux B. Torvalds.
Various other copywrites apply, but the upshot is that you
may do whatever you like with SLS, except restrict others
in any way from doing likewise, and you must leave all copywrites
intact, and you can not misrepresent or take credit for others work.


SELLING SLS:

SELLING SLS:

Softlanding has no objection to SLS being resold, but it does
have a request.  Softlanding asks that if you do resell SLS,
that you also offer customer support to your clients.  That is,
Softlanding would ideally be the only source of the unsupported
SLS distribution, or the clearing house for new versions, with
other resellers adding value in the way of support (and
most likely, price).  Softlanding, however, intends to make
no effort to enforce or coerce this policy.  It is only a
request.

See Softlanding for a gentle touch down from a DOS bailout.


Peter.

Article: 120 of comp.os.linux.announce
Xref: pavo.csi.cam.ac.uk comp.os.linux.announce:120 comp.os.linux:18288
Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.announce,comp.os.linux
Path: pavo.csi.cam.ac.uk!doc.ic.ac.uk!pipex!uunet!mcsun!news.funet.fi!
hydra!klaava!wirzeniu
From: sanjuan!pmacdona@sol.UVic.CA (Peter MacDonald)
Subject: SLS update: gcc 2.3.3, libc4.2, etc
Message-ID: <1993Jan11.205958.20840@klaava.Helsinki.FI>
Followup-To: comp.os.linux
Keywords: SLS update warning
Sender: wirzeniu@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Lars Wirzenius)
Organization: University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CANADA
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1993 20:59:58 GMT
Approved: linux-announce@tc.cornell.edu (Lars Wirzenius)
Lines: 67
Status: R

This is a 1 day warning that SLS will be ugraded tomorrow,
Monday Jan 11, 1993 at about 9:00 am PST.  Be forewarned,
if you download SLS at this time, who knows what you'll 
get.

-------------------------------------------------------------
Announcing SLS 99 p2.  This is a massive upgrade to the first
three series 'a', 'b', and 'c'.  So much has changed that
just listing them is infeasible.  Upgrading existing systems
is a problem.  Although this release has added support that
in the future will allow a automatic upgrading scheme,
it isn't finished yet.  Someday, when things settle down a 
bit I will be addressing that problem.

This release hopefully fixes most previously reported problems.
Notable exceptions are: getty/ugetty (locking and or char loss may
still not be perfect).  Ftp seems to have a problem with ls (kernel?).
Menu seems to have a problem with the change directory command.
Login doesn't like the backspace key, and requires ^H instead.
Note also, that this version of the kernel, and SCSI don't always
get along.

Some features of this release include: gcc 2.3.3, libc 4.2, many things
recompiled to use the libc 4.2, a fixed sed, /etc/clock,  screen, term, 
bc, cpio, rcs, zoneinfo, updated mailpak stuff (elm/uucp), shadow 
passwd support in everything, lilo 7, efs progs  11,  a fixed DOS emulator,
syslogd using SOCK_STREAM (as libc does),  ispell now works for emacs,
an info dir has been included to allow emacs info to work.  An updated
diff, lpr (configured correctly I hope),  a fixed minicom, and system V 
init is now standard (modified to use syslog).  The linux source includes
have been fixed.

There is also the addition of a setup script (/etc/syssetup) which is 
invoked at the end of doinstall to setup permissions and system specific
features.  The most important feature of this script is that it is
stored in a very small package (a4/syssetup.taz), which can easily 
added to and refined as problems are identified.
	
Tcpip is now setup in such a way that most normal users can configure it
by just using sethostname and domainname, editing /etc/inet/hosts,
and then running the script /etc/inet/hostcvt.build to generate
the proper name server files from the hosts file.  I will add this
to syssetup soon.

The shadow passwd suite now has a frontend for compiling existing
getpw* applications just by defining SHADOW_PWD when compiling
and adding -lshadow when linking.

The version of the kernel supplied has been compiled with two
patches in.  The first is the ipcbeta patches to give interprocess
communication and shared memory.  The other is selection, which allows 
using the mouse to cut and paste on the console.  The latter requires running
selection first.  Do "selection -h"  to see the parameters I 
added to it to allow mouse type selection etc.

I am slowly working on collecting source, but it is a lower priority
to me than the binaries.  This because, although those who want source,
want it really bad, the majority of people don't have the disk space
for source, or don't have the need, or both.  Also my time is limited.  
But mainly, I do not currently compile most of SLS.  Many components
are compiled by others.  However, I am collecting together sources for
things I do compile, as a start.  When it is ready, you will see it.

As usual, bug reports are appreciated.

Peter
pmacdona@sanjuan.uvic.ca

Newsgroups: comp.os.linux
Path: sparky!uunet!elroy.jpl.nasa.gov!usc!rpi!batcomputer!cornell!uw-beaver!cs.ubc.ca!
news.UVic.CA!sanjuan!pmacdona
From: pmacdona@sanjuan (Peter MacDonald)
Subject: SLS update: 'a' - 'c'
Message-ID: <1993Jan12.053627.2290@sol.UVic.CA>
Sender: n...@sol.UVic.CA
Nntp-Posting-Host: sanjuan.uvic.ca
Organization: University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CANADA
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 93 05:36:27 GMT
Lines: 261


The new release of SLS is now available.  It contains a massive
upgrade to series 'a', 'b', and 'c'.  The compiler and libs
have been updated, and more stuff added.  There are many 
improvements, but see RELEASE for details.

'x' will not be upgraded until 1.2 arrives (hopefully
with jump tables).

Peter
pmacd...@sanjuan.uvic.ca
------------------------------------------------------

	   SLS (SOFTLANDING LINUX SYSTEM)

		INTRODUCTION

Welcome to release .99p2 of SLS (SoftLanding Linux System).  Linux is a 
free 386 unix like operating system similar to System V, and developed
by Linus Torvalds, plus a few hundred big hearted programmers on the
Internet.   SLS is NOT just an image dump of some ones Unix system.
Instead it is a distribution whose primary purposes are:

0) provide an initial installation program (for the queasy).
1) utilities compiled to use minimal disk space.
2) provide a reasonably complete/integrated U*ix system.
3) provide a means to install and uninstall packages.
4) permit partial installations for small disk configs.
5) add a menu driven, extensible system administration.
6) take the hassle out of collecting and setting up a system.
7) give non internet users access to Linux.
8) provide a distribution that can be easily updated.

SLS contains 400-500 utilities designed to provide a relatively
complete computer operating system for the sophisticated user. It
includes programs for compression, text processing, communications,
Xwindowing system, program development (Assembler, C, C++, Fortran, 
Pascal, Lisp, and Perl),  mail, spreadsheets, and word-processing.  Also 
supported  are DOS files, a DOS emulator, SCSI, CDROMs, and TCP/IP. A
387 coprocessor is emulated by the kernel if you don't have one.  Full
source code for the kernel is also provided with SLS.

The development environment includes libraries for unix and Xwindows, a
debugger that does full screen (via emacs) with support for core dumps.
Shared libraries make the most miserly use of RAM and disk space. FAQ and
Manual pages document most of the Linux utilities.  SLS requires at least
9 Meg of disk for the minimal install.  50 Meg or more is required for the
full system (not including TeX or Interviews).  You will need at least 2
Meg of RAM, 4 meg if you want to compile programs, and 8 Meg to run
Xwindows.  Note that sometimes you can get by with less, but usually with
noticeable performance limitations.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		INSTALLATION

Before you can install Linux on your hard drive, you must partition your
drive, and put a file system on it.  Roughly, this entails:

 - Write protect all disks (do or die).
 - Boot Linux from disk a1, mounting the root disk (disk a2).
 - Create a Linux/Minix partition with "fdisk" on your hard drive and reboot.
 - Make a file system on the partition with "mkfs" (or "mkefs", see below).
 - Use "doinstall /dev/PART": PART is your partition (eg "doinstall /dev/hda2"
   or "doinstall /dev/hda2 /dev/hda3 /usr /dev/hdb1 /usr/spool" if you wish to
   have multiple partitions, with say /usr on a different partition.

Also "doinstall" will execute the script "doinst.sh" if it is found on PART.
The final step will ask you to put a formatted floppy in the drive so the
BOOT DISK can be prepared for you.  Have one ready ahead of time.  When the
installation is complete, and you reboot from this floppy, you will be using
Linux from your hard drive.   Later, you may wish to play with /usr/src/lilo
to boot from your harddrive.  Note that if you have less than 4 Meg of RAM,
you will need to make and activate a 4 Meg swap partition, prior to installation.
For example, using /dev/hda3 for swap: "mkswap /dev/hda3 4096; swapon /dev/hda3"
Before you begin, however, you may wish to type "menu" and browse the
Instructions sub menu.  But make sure you exit "menu" before you start the
install process.  You can also print files from there using "P", or you can
use "cat README > /dev/lp1" or "cat README > /dev/lp2".

Your first task after the base install is done, should be to make backup
copies of all of your disks  (Look in the "User Commands" menu). In fact,
you should make sure all disks are write protected before you start the
installation.  After the install, you can log on as "root".  Later, you may
install interviews with: "sysinstall -series i" Note, although you can use
the Extended FS type, it is not recommended (read as not tested), and is 
subject to change.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		EXAMPLE PARTITIONING PROCEDURE

... Put disk a1 in drive A: and reboot computer, then put disk a2 in the
... floppy drive you will be doing the install from (usually A: as well).

/# fdisk
 
Command (m for help): n
Command action
   e   extended
   p   primary partition (1-4)
p
Partition number (1-4): 2
First cylinder (500-977): 500
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (500-977): 977
 
Command (m for help): t
Partition number (1-4): 1
Hex code (type L to list codes): 81
 
Command (m for help): v
Command (m for help): p
 
Disk /dev/hda: 5 heads, 17 sectors, 977 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 85 * 512 bytes
 
   Device Boot  Begin   Start     End  Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda1           1       1     499   20000    4  DOS
/dev/hda2           1       1       7   30000   81  Linux/MINIX

Command (m for help): w
reboot now before doing anything else
/#
...
/# mkfs /dev/hda2 30000
/# doinstall /dev/hda2
... Follow prompts, and insert disks as requested, then login as root.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		ADDITIONAL SLS INFORMATION

A menu interface allows the user to see what commands would be executed if
an option was selected.  Unix newbies who use SLS don't have to always stay
newbies. SLS is a binary mostly distribution (except for the kernel), and is
broken into multiple parts, or series, each of which is denoted by a letter
followed by the disk number as follows:

	a1-aN: The minimal base system
	b1-bN: Base system extras, like man pages, emacs etc.
	c1-cN: The compiler(s), gcc/g++/p2c/f2c
	x1-xN: The X-windows distribution
	t1-tN: TeX (document processing)

This scheme allows new disks to be added to the distribution without
changing the disk numbering.  Also, the sysinstall program doesn't have to
be changed when new disks are added as the last disk is marked by the
presence of the file "install.end".  And when interviews is added, say as
a new series "i", it can be installed with:

	sysinstall -series i

Highlights of the base are:  gcc/g++, emacs, kermit, elm/mail/uucp, gdb, sc
(spreadsheet), man pages, groff, elvis, zip/zoo/lh and menu.  Highlights of
X are: X, programmers libs, 75 dpi fonts, games (spider, tetris, xvier,
chess, othello, xeyes, etc) and utilities like xmag, xmenu, xcolormap and
ghostscript.  Approximate usage is as follows:

Tiny base system:        9 Meg  (Series 'a')
Main base system:       25 Meg  (Series 'a', 'b' and 'c')
Main base system + X11: 45 Meg  (Series 'a', 'b', 'c' and 'x')
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		LINUX SPECIFIC INFORMATION

Linux supports multiple VC's (virtual consoles).  You can switch from one 
to the other using the "LEFT-ALT-FN" keys.  The right ALT key will not work.
The console in linux more or less emulates a VT100.  So you can usually
just use kermit to do your remote logins (even while doing the install :-).
If you have a color monitor, you can even use color using the "setterm"
utility, or just execute the "/etc/startcons" script to have all VC's set
to default values.  If your screen gets garbled, you can use "reset".
Up arrow recalls previous commands.   Use the "man" command to read the
Linux manual pages, and the "man -k X" to list commands with the keyword
"X" in the command description.  The system editor is "vi" but you might
find "joe" easier to learn.

Never just power off your Linux system.  Instead type "sync", wait a sec,
then powerdown or reboot.   If your disk gets in trouble (or every
couple of weeks anyways) you may wish to run "fsck -av PART" where PART
is your partition, to try to fix any problems.

Dos files can be accessed in one of two ways.  The first uses the mtools
commands (mdir, mcopy, mtype, ...).  The file "/etc/mtools" may need
some tweeking, especially if you use mformat.  The second method is to
mount the dos disk/partition onto a directory.  eg: 

	mount -t msdos /dev/fd0 /user

Swapping can be set up of size SIZE, to a partition or to a file using:

	mkswap file SIZE
	swapon file

Linux can be booted without the floppy using /usr/src/lilo.  Important 
directories include:

"/etc"		- System configuration information
"/usr/src"	- Miscellaneous packages.
"/usr/X386/*"	- Xwindows stuff
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		CONFIGURING X-WINDOWS

Getting X-windows to run on your PC can sometimes be a bit of a sobering 
experience, mostly because there are so many types of video cards for the PC.  
Linux X11 supports only VGA type video cards, but there are so many types of 
VGA's that only certain ones are fully supported.  SLS comes with two Xwindows 
servers.  The full color one, X386, supports some or all ET300, ET400, PVGA1,
GVGA, Trident, and ATI plus.  Others may or may not work.

The other server, X386mono, should work with virtually any VGA card, but only 
in monochrome mode.  Accordingly, it also uses less memory, and should be
faster than the color one.  But of course it doesn't look as nice.

The bulk of the Xwindows configuration information is stored in the directory
"/usr/X386/lib/X11/".  In particular, the file "Xconfig" defines the timings
for the monitor and the video card.  Setting up the monochrome server is pretty
straightforward.  

	cd /usr/X386/bin/ 
	mv -i X386 X386color		# don't overwrite old one
	mv X386mono X386
	cd /usr/X386/lib/X11/
	mv -i Xconfig Xconfig.color	# don't overwrite old one
	mv Xconfig.mono Xconfig

Now you just have to edit Xconfig to set the mouse device and type "startx".
Setting up the color server is similar, except that usually, you need to
figure out the clock timings to put in Xconfig.  README.modegen explains
how you can use the spreadsheet to figure out your clock timings based upon
your monitor specifications.  More information can be found in the directory
/usr/X386/lib/X11.  But be prepared to fiddle.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		AVAILABILITY

SLS is available from the address below for a $3.25/disk US ($4.00/disk 
Canadian) copying charge.  Add $1.00/disk for 3 1/2" disks, and $15.00 for
shipping and handling.  Mail payment, either cheque or money order, 
in advance, to Softlanding.   Visa and Mastercard are now also accepted,
albeit with a 4% surcharge.  Because people keep asking about prices,
Softlanding has provided this commonly ordered configurations price sheet:

NAME #DISKS  SERIES 	     5 1/4 DISKS               3 1/2 DISKS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
TINY  4      a            US $28.00 (CDN $31.00)     US $32.00 (CDN $35.00)
BASE  17     a,b,c        US $70.25 (CDN $87.00)     US $87.25 (CDN $105.00)
MAIN  25     a,b,c,x      US $100.25 (CDN $115.00)   US $121.25 (CDN $140.00)
FULL  30     a,b,c,x,t    US $112.50 (CDN $135.00)   US $142.50 (CDN $165.00)

When ordering, ensure that you specify the bootdisk type (3 1/2 or 5 1/4).
Softlanding is also now offering support subscriptions for SLS.
Individual support, (one user, one machine) is US $100.00 per year.
Group support, primarily for resellers and corporate sites is 
US $1000.00 per year.

	Softlanding Software               
	910 Lodge Ave. 
	Victoria, B.C., Canada             
	V8X-3A8            
	(604) 360-0188

See Softlanding for a gentle touch down from a DOS bailout.

Article: 343 of comp.os.linux.announce
Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.announce
Path: pavo.csi.cam.ac.uk!warwick!pipex!sunic!news.funet.fi!hydra!klaava!wirzeniu
From: sanjuan!pmacdona@sol.UVic.CA (Peter MacDonald)
Subject: SLS update: complete details enclosed
Message-ID: <1993Mar3.094700.26672@klaava.Helsinki.FI>
Followup-To: comp.os.linux
Keywords: SLS update, fontpak, ethernet, efs2
Sender: wirzeniu@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Lars Wirzenius)
Organization: University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CANADA
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1993 09:47:00 GMT
Approved: linux-announce@tc.cornell.edu (Lars Wirzenius)
Lines: 297

The dirty deed is done.  
This release of SLS includes the following features:

	- Fontpak, to load the vgafonts (also fixes X font smears).
	- Donald Beckers ethernet drivers, with auto-irq/address, etc.
	- A new efs2.  This is a special unrelease 0.2b by Remy Card,
	  that is incompatible with the previous releases, but will
	  be compatible with the subsequent and final release.  One test
	  was to compile IV (so doc and idraw will be up soon).
	- as before, the selection and IPC beta+ patches.

In this release, all patches are pre-applied to the source, because
some tweaking was required to get it all to work.  But, that is not
to say that future releases will do the same.

Note, also, that with the ethernet patches soft-booting no
longer works (at least with the WD one), so reset must be used,
or power cycle.  Not a big deal to most of us.

Also, the kernel, with all the SCSI devices, etc compiled in is now 
too large to boot without using the new zBoot compressed kernel feature 
(nice timing Linus).   So if you have less than 4 Meg, there is almost 
no hope of booting and installing.  Hopefully, when the old efs
and minix fs are dropped, pounds will be shed.

The HISTORY file (now renamed to ChangeLog) has these additions:

	a1: new 99p6 boot image
	a2: new root image
	a3/efs2.tpz: progs and stuff for ext fs 2
	a3/fontpak.tpz: fontpak stuff
	a4/zoneinfo.tpz: was on a2
	b4/lx99p6.tpz: new kernel source, pre-patched
	c2/gdb.tpz: updated gdb.
	x6/xother.tpz: additions to X11 stuff

The next set of updates will likely be just that: updates of some
rapidly aging components.

And the SLS README file follows.  But first a Softlanding Announcement:

Softlanding is now accepting orders for it's CDROM due in about 6 weeks
time (April 15th).  It will contain the full SLS system, plus sources.
The CD will cost $99.00 US, plus $15 S&H and will include a printed
manual of SLS specific information.   Orders received before April
15th, however are discounted to $89.00.  Quantity prices are also available.
Softlanding now also has SLS available on QIC-150 tape for $150.00 US.

Peter
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
	SLS (SOFTLANDING LINUX SYSTEM)

		INTRODUCTION

Welcome to release .99p6 of SLS (SoftLanding Linux System).  Linux is a 
free 386 unix like operating system similar to System V, and developed
by Linus Torvalds, plus a few hundred big hearted programmers on the
Internet.   SLS is NOT just an image dump of some ones Unix system.
Instead it is a distribution whose primary purposes are:

0) provide an initial installation program (for the queasy).
1) utilities compiled to use minimal disk space.
2) provide a reasonably complete/integrated U*ix system.
3) provide a means to install and uninstall packages.
4) permit partial installations for small disk configs.
5) add a menu driven, extensible system administration.
6) take the hassle out of collecting and setting up a system.
7) give non internet users access to Linux.
8) provide a distribution that can be easily updated.

SLS contains 400-500 utilities designed to provide a relatively
complete computer operating system for the sophisticated user. It
includes programs for compression, text processing, communications,
Xwindowing system, program development (Assembler, C, C++, Fortran, 
Pascal, Lisp, and Perl),  mail, spreadsheets, and word-processing.  Also 
supported  are DOS files, a DOS emulator, SCSI, CDROMs, and TCP/IP. A
387 coprocessor is emulated by the kernel if you don't have one.  Full
source code for the kernel is also provided with SLS.

The development environment includes libraries for unix and Xwindows, a
debugger that does full screen (via emacs) with support for core dumps.
Shared libraries make the most miserly use of RAM and disk space. FAQ and
Manual pages document most of the Linux utilities.  SLS requires at least
9 Meg of disk for the minimal install.  50 Meg or more is required for the
full system (not including TeX or Interviews).  You will need at least 2
Meg of RAM, 4 meg if you want to compile programs, and 8 Meg to run
Xwindows.  Note that sometimes you can get by with less, but usually with
noticeable performance limitations.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		INSTALLATION

Before you can install Linux on your hard drive, you must partition your
drive, and put a file system on it.  Roughly, this entails:

 - Write protect all disks except a2 (do or die).
 - Boot Linux from disk a1, mounting the root disk (disk a2).
 - Create a Linux/Minix partition with "fdisk" on your hard drive and reboot.
 - Make a file system on the partition with "mkfs" (or "mke2fs", see below).
 - Use "doinstall /dev/PART": PART is your partition (eg "doinstall /dev/hda2"
   or "doinstall /dev/hda2 /dev/hda3 /usr /dev/hdb1 /usr/spool" if you wish to
   have multiple partitions, with say /usr on a different partition.

Also "doinstall" will execute the script "doinst.sh" if it is found on PART.
The final step will ask you to put a formatted floppy in the drive so the
BOOT DISK can be prepared for you.  Have one ready ahead of time.  When the
installation is complete, and you reboot from this floppy, you will be using
Linux from your hard drive.   Later, you may wish to play with /usr/src/lilo
to boot from your harddrive.  Note that if you have less than 4 Meg of RAM,
you will likely not have enought memory to do the installation.  But you can
try to make and activate a 4 Meg swap partition, prior to installation.
For example, using /dev/hda3 for swap: "mkswap /dev/hda3 4096; swapon /dev/hda3"
Before you begin, however, you may wish to type "menu" and browse the
Instructions sub menu.  But make sure you exit "menu" before you start the
install process.  You can also print files from there using "P", or you can
use "cat README > /dev/lp1" or "cat README > /dev/lp2".

Your first task after the base install is done, should be to make backup
copies of all of your disks  (Look in the "User Commands" menu). In fact,
you should make sure all disks (except a2) are write protected before you start 
the installation.  After the install, you can log on as "root".  Note the new
Extended FS type 2, it is now the recommended file system to use, although
the old minix fs can be used and is still the default.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		EXAMPLE PARTITIONING PROCEDURE

... Put disk a1 in drive A: and reboot computer, then put disk a2 in the
... floppy drive you will be doing the install from (usually A: as well).

/# fdisk
 
Command (m for help): n
Command action
   e   extended
   p   primary partition (1-4)
p
Partition number (1-4): 2
First cylinder (500-977): 500
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (500-977): 977
 
Command (m for help): t
Partition number (1-4): 1
Hex code (type L to list codes): 81
 
Command (m for help): v
Command (m for help): p
 
Disk /dev/hda: 5 heads, 17 sectors, 977 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 85 * 512 bytes
 
   Device Boot  Begin   Start     End  Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda1           1       1     499   20000    4  DOS
/dev/hda2           1       1       7   30000   81  Linux/MINIX

Command (m for help): w
reboot now before doing anything else
/#
...< after the reboot>
/# mke2fs /dev/hda2 30000
/# doinstall /dev/hda2
... Follow prompts, and insert disks as requested, then login as root.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		ADDITIONAL SLS INFORMATION

A menu interface allows the user to see what commands would be executed if
an option was selected.  Unix newbies who use SLS don't have to always stay
newbies. SLS is a binary mostly distribution (except for the kernel), and is
broken into multiple parts, or series, each of which is denoted by a letter
followed by the disk number as follows:

	a1-aN: The minimal base system
	b1-bN: Base system extras, like man pages, emacs etc.
	c1-cN: The compiler(s), gcc/g++/p2c/f2c
	x1-xN: The X-windows distribution (+idraw and doc)
	t1-tN: TeX (document processing)
	s1-sN: Source code for critical system components
	d1-dN: Documentation for various things

This scheme allows new disks to be added to the distribution without
changing the disk numbering.  Also, the sysinstall program doesn't have to
be changed when new disks are added as the last disk is marked by the
presence of the file "install.end".  And when interviews is added, say as
a new series "t", it can be installed with:

	sysinstall -series t

Highlights of the base are:  gcc/g++, emacs, kermit, elm/mail/uucp, gdb, sc
(spreadsheet), man pages, groff, elvis, zip/zoo/lh and menu.  Highlights of
X are: X, programmers libs, 75 dpi fonts, games (spider, tetris, xvier,
chess, othello, xeyes, etc) and utilities like xmag, xmenu, xcolormap and
ghostscript.  Approximate usage is as follows:

Tiny base system:       15 Meg  (Series 'a')
Main base system:       45 Meg  (Series 'a', 'b' and 'c')
Main base system + X11: 70 Meg  (Series 'a', 'b', 'c' and 'x')
Full system:            90 Meg  (Series 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 's', 't' and 'x')
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		LINUX SPECIFIC INFORMATION

Linux supports multiple VC's (virtual consoles).  You can switch from one 
to the other using the "LEFT-ALT-FN" keys.  The right ALT key will not work.
The console in linux more or less emulates a VT100.  So you can usually
just use kermit to do your remote logins (even while doing the install :-).
If you have a color monitor, you can even use color using the "setterm"
utility, or just execute the "/etc/startcons" script to have all VC's set
to default values.  If your screen gets garbled, you can use "reset".
Up arrow recalls previous commands.   Use the "man" command to read the
Linux manual pages, and the "man -k X" to list commands with the keyword
"X" in the command description.  The system editor is "vi" but you might
find "joe" easier to learn.

Never just power off your Linux system.  Instead type "sync", wait a sec,
then powerdown or reboot.   If your disk gets in trouble (or every
couple of weeks anyways) you may wish to run "fsck -av PART" where PART
is your partition, to try to fix any problems.

Dos files can be accessed in one of two ways.  The first uses the mtools
commands (mdir, mcopy, mtype, ...).  The file "/etc/mtools" may need
some tweeking, especially if you use mformat.  The second method is to
mount the dos disk/partition onto a directory.  eg: 

	mount -t msdos /dev/fd0 /user

Swapping can be set up of size SIZE, to a partition or to a file using:

	mkswap file SIZE
	swapon file

Linux can be booted without the floppy using /usr/src/lilo.  Important 
directories include:

"/etc"		- System configuration information
"/usr/src"	- Miscellaneous packages.
"/usr/X386/*"	- Xwindows stuff
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		CONFIGURING X-WINDOWS

Getting X-windows to run on your PC can sometimes be a bit of a sobering 
experience, mostly because there are so many types of video cards for the PC.  
Linux X11 supports only VGA type video cards, but there are so many types of 
VGA's that only certain ones are fully supported.  SLS comes with two Xwindows 
servers.  The full color one, X386, supports some or all ET300, ET400, PVGA1,
GVGA, Trident, and ATI plus.  Others may or may not work.

The other server, X386mono, should work with virtually any VGA card, but only 
in monochrome mode.  Accordingly, it also uses less memory, and should be
faster than the color one.  But of course it doesn't look as nice.

The bulk of the Xwindows configuration information is stored in the directory
"/usr/X386/lib/X11/".  In particular, the file "Xconfig" defines the timings
for the monitor and the video card.   By default, X windows is setup to use
the color server, but you can switch to using the monochrome server x386mono, 
if the color one gives you trouble, since it should support any standard vga.
Essentially, this just means making /usr/X386/bin/X a link to it.

Just edit Xconfig to set the mouse device type and timings, and enter "startx".
To figure out the clock timings to put in Xconfig.  README.modegen explains
how you can use the spreadsheet to figure out your clock timings based upon
your monitor specifications.  More information can be found in the directory
/usr/X386/lib/X11.  But be prepared to fiddle.  Oh, try ctl-alt-F1 in X :-)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

		AVAILABILITY

SLS is available from the address below for a $3.50/disk US ($4.50/disk 
Canadian) copying charge.  Add $1.00/disk for 3 1/2" disks, and $15.00 for
shipping and handling.  Mail payment, either cheque or money order, 
in advance, to Softlanding.   Visa and Mastercard are now also accepted,
albeit with a 4% surcharge.  Because people keep asking about prices,
Softlanding has provided this commonly ordered configurations price sheet:

NAME #DISKS  SERIES 	     5 1/4 DISKS               3 1/2 DISKS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
TINY  4      a             US $28.00 (CDN $31.00)     US $32.00 (CDN $35.00)
BASE  17     a,b,c         US $70.25 (CDN $87.00)     US $87.25 (CDN $105.00)
MAIN  25     a,b,c,x       US $100.25 (CDN $115.00)   US $121.25 (CDN $140.00)
FULL  30     a,b,c,x,d,s,t US $112.50 (CDN $135.00)   US $142.50 (CDN $165.00)

When ordering, ensure that you specify the bootdisk type (3 1/2 or 5 1/4).
Softlanding is also now offering support subscriptions for SLS.
Individual support, (one user, one machine) is $100.00 per year.
Group support, primarily for resellers and corporate sites is 
$1000.00 per year.  CDROM ($99) and QIC-150 tape ($150) also available.

	Softlanding Software               
	910 Lodge Ave. 
	Victoria, B.C., Canada             
	V8X-3A8            
	(604) 360-0188,  FAX (604) 385-1292

See Softlanding for a gentle touch down from a DOS bailout.

Article: 350 of comp.os.linux.announce
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Path: pavo.csi.cam.ac.uk!warwick!str-ccsun!dunlop.cs.strath.ac.uk!
bnr.co.uk!pipex!sunic!news.funet.fi!hydra!klaava!wirzeniu
From: tguez@jade.tufts.edu (Name)
Subject: (Correction+Update) SLS - Get entire SLS on 3 1/2 disks for $85.5 or 52.00!!
Message-ID: <1993Mar4.212847.13154@klaava.Helsinki.FI>
Followup-To: comp.os.linux
Keywords: floppy distribution
Sender: wirzeniu@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Lars Wirzenius)
Organization: Tufts University - Medford, MA
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1993 21:28:47 GMT
Approved: linux-announce@tc.cornell.edu (Lars Wirzenius)
Lines: 105

SLS - Get entire SLS on 3 1/2 disks for $85.5 or $52.00!!! 

Downloadling the entire SLS with a 9600 baud connection takes about 8
hours, and with a 2400 baud connection about 20 hours.  Instead of
wasting all this time and energy order the entire SLS on disks for a
modest price:


	US$1.5 	copying charge per disk
	US$1.2 	per 3 1/2 disk
	US$1.0 	per 5 1/4 disk

	US$10.0   Shipping and handling 

Your *TOTAL* price			   (see below for Options)
				    Options 1 & 2		Option 3
Series		#Disks		(3 1/2)		(5 1/2)	     (either media)
a		4		$20.80	  	$20.00		$16.00
a,b,c,d		16		$53.20		$50.00		$34.00
a,b,c,d,x	24		$74.80		$70.00		$46.00
a,b,c,d,x,t,s	28		$85.50		$80.00		$52.00
(all prices are in US$, not including Tax if in MA)

Of course one can order individual disks, series or any combinations.
Prices may change at any time without notice.  Please add 5% tax, if in
MA.

To order:
	Options
		(1)	Mail a check or money order in advance 
			for 30% of total charge, and receive the 
			disks UPS COD for the remaining 70%.
	

		(2)	Mail a check or money order in advance 
			for the	entire sum, and receive the disks
			UPS.


		(3)	Send  *YOUR* blank disks.  We shall
			format these disks for you and copy
			the SLS on them.  You will only
			be charged for copying, the usual
			$1.5 per copy.

			Same payment plans as above apply.

NOTE:  All disks are varified *twice* before they are mailed.  All shipment 
leave us within two days with a blue UPS label (2nd day air).


	When you order please include:
	
	1) Your name
	2) Phone number
	3) a UPS deliverable address
	4) The type of *boot* disks you need 5 1/4 or 3 1/2
	   (note: only disks a1 and a2 are required to boot)
	5) The type (5 1/4 or 3 1/2) of non-booting disks
 	   you would like.
	6) If you choose option 3, indicate what you would like
	   us to do if one of your disks is defective.
		(i)   Replace that disk for you.
		      $1.2 for 3.5 or $1.0 for 5.25.

		(ii)  Await for you to send us a replacement disk.
		(iii) Send you back all the disks, and mark the
		      ones that were defective-- you will only
		      be charged ($1.5 copying) for the disks that 
		      did *not* fail.


	Please mail your order to:

		ATC, Computer Science Dept.
		31 Memorial Dr., P.O.Box 504
		Avon, MA 02322
		
		Questions can be address to:
		 tguez@jade.tufts.edu
		

	Also available is our SLS accessories disk which contains
	all the necessary utilities to setup partitions, setup
	up sls to boot from HD (easily), and a few more
	invaluable dos/unix/linux utils that do not come
	with the SLS and are certainly necessary to complete
	the integration: $1.5 copying charge, $1.0 for 5 1/4 disk
	or $1.2 for 3 1/2 disks.

	If you order the entire sls disks series you will also
	receive a laser printed copy of the necessary README
	files for installation.


        When a new version of the SLS is available, you may
        send back your disks to receive a copy of the new
        version.  You will only be charged with a copy charge
        of the usual $1.5 per disk updated.  If any of your disks
        becomes defective by the time it reaches us, we will
        replace it for you with the usual $1.0 for 5 1/2 or $1.2
        for 3 1/4 for each defective disk.

	Do not waste time downloading something of that size,
	order it-- it's worth it.

Article: 358 of comp.os.linux.announce
Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.announce
Path: pavo.csi.cam.ac.uk!warwick!pipex!sunic!news.funet.fi!hydra!klaava!wirzeniu
From: sanjuan!pmacdona@sol.UVic.CA (Peter MacDonald)
Subject: SLS update: doc, idraw, et al.
Message-ID: <1993Mar7.100051.13827@klaava.Helsinki.FI>
Followup-To: comp.os.linux
Keywords: SLS update, doc, idraw, Interview
Sender: wirzeniu@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Lars Wirzenius)
Organization: University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CANADA
Date: Sun, 7 Mar 1993 10:00:51 GMT
Approved: linux-announce@tc.cornell.edu (Lars Wirzenius)
Lines: 16

[ Moderator's note: idraw is a drawing program, doc is a multi-font
  editor, and iv (InterViews) libs and incs are libraries and includes
  for programming with the InterViews ui toolkit. -lasu ]

idraw, doc and the iv libs and incs are on tsx-11.  Yes so now
there is 30 disks in SLS, and there it should stay (I hope).
Later, IV will be updated to shared libs.  Also, I will get
around to fixing the image so that the video mode is not preselected
after install, as someone so casually mentioned :-).
In the meantime, before you reboot after an install, just do a 

	mount [-t e2fs] /dev/hda /root; rdev -v /root/Image -3

sync and reboot.

Peter

			  SCO's Case Against IBM

November 12, 2003 - Jed Boal from Eyewitness News KSL 5 TV provides an
overview on SCO's case against IBM. Darl McBride, SCO's president and CEO,
talks about the lawsuit's impact and attacks. Jason Holt, student and 
Linux user, talks about the benefits of code availability and the merits 
of the SCO vs IBM lawsuit. See SCO vs IBM.

Note: The materials and information included in these Web pages are not to
be used for any other purpose other than private study, research, review
or criticism.